Laurel L. Russwurm

a writer, the copyfight and internet freedom

Archive for May 2011

“Inconstant Moon” update ~ Living in a Serial World

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a graphic banner reads Inconstant Moon. rendered in the Rebel Caps font with a gibbous moon nestled between the words

Fireworks

Woo hoo! The new and improved “Inconstant Moon” blog is in place. Although not entirely set up, it is a beginning.

Over the coming months I will be serializing my debut novel in the moonblog. As well, I’ll be building pages of additional content, Inconstant Moon “special features” as it were. The original plan was to chronicle self-publishing adventures in the side pages of the moonblog, but instead the issues faced getting my debut novel to press will be featured in the Libreleft Books blog. I hope you’ll bear with me, after all I am making this up as I go along.

So, the Inconstant Moon serialization has begun with the first preamble page. The first story segment will be posted on Sunday, May 29th, with one page every day thereafter until the end, one hundred and forty pages in all.

Unfortunately, it has all taken so much longer than I thought it would, and so life has intervened.

What that means is that I will not be able to meet my goal of launching everything at once. But I simply can’t stand can’t putting it off any longer, so serialization will happen first. I won’t have time to work on the ebook conversion, or to even set up my CreateSpace ebook storefront anytime before the weekend. Look for it next week. In the meantime, the world will have to be content with just the serialization for now.

:D

Written by Laurel L. Russwurm

May 26, 2011 at 3:37 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

“Inconstant Moon” ~ update: Libreleft Books Blog

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The text Libreleft Books is above the gibbous moon and the text SelfPub below, on a blue field

Everything takes longer than I thought it would. Part of it is the learning curve.

Although I’m working at setting up the Inconstant Moon serialization blog, it is has proved far more difficult than anticipated. XHTML is one thing, PHP is something else again.

Part of what I’ve been wrestling has been my plan to include supporting material, background &tc. for Inconstant Moon. As well, from the outset I have always intended to blog about the experience, in hopes of helping others following this path. Any way you slice it, it is two very different sets of blog pages.

And then, of course, I’m nearly done the first draft of my next novel. As soon as Inconstant Moon is in the can, I’ll be getting back to the Girl In The Blue Flame Cafe. That’s when it It occurred to me that what I really need is a central Libreleft Books blog. It would, of course, provide the perfect place to gather all my self publishing tidbits. So, that’s what I’ve done today… well, yesterday into today. So it’s a beginning, and I am quite sure it will evolve, but it’s just a beginning.

So it isn’t just the learning curve. Not that I needed another blog, or anything…. ;D but the Libreleft Books Blog is begun.

Anyway, the birds are chirping and it’s gotten rather light out there, so I’d really better grab a bit of sleep before getting back to my serial theme.

[I won't mention that between the computer crash and the upgrade, my serialzation blog seems to have been knocked about... ]

Oh, right; the tentative date for the Inconstant Moon release is Friday May 27th.

Ulp.

Written by Laurel L. Russwurm

May 23, 2011 at 6:01 am

“Inconstant Moon” update ~ Uploaded

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a graphic banner reads Inconstant Moon. rendered in the Rebel Caps font with a gibbous moon nestled between the words

blue balloon that says WOOT

I made my final-final upload to CreateSpace just before midnight on May 11th.

woot!

This is the “final-final” proof because I was certain that the previous proof would be “it.”
That’s why I cleverly called it the “final proof.”    But I was wrong.   There were too many typos.

What began as proof reading on the two previous “proofs” morphed into extensive editing.   So they were actually new drafts, and of course the editing process itself left all sorts of additional debris.  What I should have done was to proofread again after the editing was finished.
For this final-final proof, editing didn’t come into it. It was truly proof read.
And then I proofed it again, just to make sure.
And now I am sure that this is “it.”
When the final-final book-book proof arrives, I expect it will receive near immediate approval.

“ensemble” novel

The only editorial change in this final-final version is the inclusion of a dramatis personæ page. This is something I’d been meaning to do since the second draft but never quite got around to. Although unnecessary for most books, I expect it might be very helpful for Inconstant Moon due to the size of the cast of characters. Most novels have a single protagonist, but the way it worked out, Inconstant Moon has an ensemble cast.

Because the story deals with a brutal attack of a student, the story is told through several overlapping groups of students.
My assumption going in was that one of the characters would emerge as the protagonist. What happened instead was that the characters balanced themselves out far more evenly than I had envisaged, emphatically turning it into an ensemble novel.

[I'm learning that there are categories for everything.]

My Inconstant Moon ensemble has rather more characters than Amy Tan has in The Joy Luck Club, or Meg Waite Clayton has in “The Four Ms. Bradwells.” And I’m pretty sure I have even more characters than Ed McBain has in his 87th Precinct series.

And although the serialization blog will have character pages, those who prefer to hold a physical book will benefit from having the cast list accessible on the printed page.

proof copies on my desk

I’ve been told that standard practice is to release the ebook first, then the book-book. And I have no idea if anyone else (besides Cory Doctorow) does online serializations.  The theory goes that drawing the process out over time allows time for buzz to build, as well as providing fodder for things to talk about online.  [Like that's ever been my problem!] And besides, I’ve been talking about Inconstant Moon online for so long that it’s high time for me to shut up and let the readers decide.

CreateSpace estimates the final proof copy should be in my hand by May 26th, 2011.   And I anticipate making a near immediate approval.  (To be doubly certain, I proofed it twice.)

This gives me time to get my serialization blog theme ready to go.

And learn how to do the ebook conversions.

I’m going to launch it all at once.

The serialization will begin when both the book-book and the e-book versions
are available. There won’t be a book trailer until I find time to master Linux editing software. Nor have I looked into any of the other online marketing strategies.

Unfortunately, the interesting times we’re living in have provided a bit too much distraction, so I’m not as organized as I should be.  Maybe next time.

Once Inconstant Moon is in hand I can get back to work on my second novel,
which I expect to publish by October. 
I’ll know what I’m doing by then. 
Right?  :D



Free Font Credits:
The Inconstant Moon font is Jay Batchelor’s Rebel Caps
The Woot font is Kingthings Bloone!



Election Day: 41st Canadian Parliament – VOTE

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My son tells me that the answer to any question about Canadian authors in Reach For The Top is always “Margaret Atwood.” Which means that Margaret Atwood is a famous writer. And it is no doubt that Ms. Atwood’s famous support has helped the Project Democracy website convince people to vote the way someone else tells them to. Perhaps Ms. Atwood should go read her own speculative fiction and think about root causes that lead to dystopias. Voting for what you don’t want certainly seems to me to be the first step along that slippery slope.

The only way to strategic vote is to not waste my vote by voting someone else’s strategy; and vote for my own choice in my riding.  I hope you do too.

vote like a pirate?

I wish Canada had proportional representation. If we did, I might be able to vote for everyone I wanted to.
[To find out about electoral reform. take a look at the non-partisan Fairvote Canada]

Pirate Party of Canada Leader, Edmonton Center MP Candidate Mikkel Paulson

Pirate Party of Canada
I might be able to vote for a Pirate Party Candidate. The Pirate Party is a newly registered Canadian Political Party, running on a platform of Copyright reform & Access to Culture, Privacy, Patent Law reform, Net Neutrality, Open Government and Open Access. The Pirate Party will not be able to form a government during this election because they have only fielded ten candidates.

Even so, if there was a Pirate Party candidate running in my riding, that is where my vote would be cast. Because digital issues including Canada’s digital economy, privacy and civil liberties need to be addressed by people who understand them. And it has become horribly clear that the entrenched parties’ understanding of these issues is faulty at best. It might not be such an important issue except that our recent governments have demonstrated their unwillingness to listen to or learn from citizen input on these subjects, but rather to create legislation favoring American Corporate interests.
StopUBB logo

I have spent a great deal of my time over the past two years writing about Usage Based Billing. The CRTC is not following its ostensible mandate to safeguard Canadian consumer interest. To some extent this is because Canadian Law doesn’t require it.

Kitchener-Waterloo Pirate Party MP Candidate Steven Bradley Scott

The former Conservative government’s response to unacceptable CRTC rulings was to intervene situationally, rather than to fix the problem by fixing the law. [Had it been a majority government, there might not have been any intervention.] Doing an end run around a bad law and leaving the bad law in place is not good governance. Dissolving or at least reforming the CRTC to include technically informed members as well as consumers instead of Bell Canada staffers would go a long way to achieving true net neutrality which would support Canada’s ability to compete well in the global economy.

The neighboring Riding of Kitchener-Waterloo is fortunate to have Steven Scott running as a Pirate Party candidate.  I would vote for him if I could.

deciding how to cast my vote

Personal privacy is important, so I was pleased to witness my child’s refusal to answer a party canvasser who demanded to know how he would vote. As bad as our system is, we do still have a secret ballot. No one has the right to know how anyone will vote.

In my riding, I have four candidates to choose from. Anyone who has read anything I have written about Canadian politics would be justified in thinking I will not be casting a vote for either the Liberal or Conservative candidate. Even so, for every election I make up my mind anew.

As seems to be the case in every riding for this 41st Canadian election, the Conservative and Liberal party are attacking each other more than actually offering any solutions. When one considers that the past actions of these two parties are responsible for many problems we face:

  • erosion of universal health care (in 30 years I’ve only ever seen health care cuts)
  • erosion of democracy (G20, Byron Sonne, premature prorogation, contempt of parliament)
  • taxation imbalance between corporate taxation (near non-existent) and citiizens (crushed by ever increasing burden)

I’m not voting for

My Conservative Party incumbent, who uses his past life as a Christian pastor as an badge of morality while allowing impropriety in his office, then compounds the problem by not taking responsibility.

My Liberal Party candidate who spent more time finger pointing than convincing me he would do a good job in office.

My Green Party candidate who is too new and shaky on his party’s platform. Being a self-confessed SUV driver did not help.


My NDP candidate is also new, but by way of contrast Lorne Bruce not only knows the party platform, he clearly believes in it. Instead of talking without substance, he stays on point.

I think that he will get things done and consider the wishes of constituents.   We need a responsive government that serves Canadian interests, not a sock-puppets that will ram through American dictated legislation like Bill C-32.  I think the NDP may be able to do that.  What I do know is that they can’t possibly do a worse job than our previous governments.  And they support electoral reform. Which is why the NDP’s Lorne Bruce will get my vote in this election.

That’s me, making my own choice.

In a democracy, we all do. Our system is broken, but it is important for Canadians to get involved so it can be fixed.

It’s interesting that citizens are beginning to realize that we don’t have to vote for candidates we don’t believe in.

Today is Election Day.

All Canadians should vote. 

And if you can, bring a friend.

Flag agaisnt the sky



Steven Scott photo released by the Pirate Party of Canada under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0) License.

Mikkel Paulson photo released by the Pirate Party of Canada under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0) License.

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